Correction of secondary hyperparathyroidism with paricalcitol in renal transplant improves left ventricular hypertrophy

Abstract

Background – Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is common in renal transplant recipients (RTRs), and persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is considered to be one of the main causes of its pathogenesis. In this study we evaluated if the control of SHPT with paricalcitol is associated with a reduction of LVH in RTRs. Methods – For this purpose we selected 24 RTRs with LVH and SHPT . Secondary hyperparathyroidism was defined as PTH levels 1.5 times higher than the high normal limits, while LVH was defined as a left ventricular mass index (LVMi) >95g/m2 in females, and >115g/m2 in males. Treatment with paricalcitol started at mean dose of 1µg/day and lasted 18 months. The dose of paricalcitol was reduced to 1µg on the other day when serum calcium was >10.5mg/dl and/or fractional excretion of calcium was >0.020%; administration was temporarily stopped when serum calcium was >11 mg/dl. Results – At follow-up PTH levels decreased from 198 ± 155 to 105 ± 43pg/ml (P < .01), and LVMi decreased from 134 ± 21 to 113 ± 29g/m2 (P < .01); the presence of LVH decreased from 100% at baseline to 54% at F-U. Serum calcium levels showed a modest and not significant increase. Renal function was stable in all patients. Conclusions – Secondary hyperparathyroidism seems to play an important role in the development and maintenance of LVH and its correction with paricalcitol has a favorable impact on its progression.

Keywords: left ventricular hypertrophy; parathormone; paricalcitol; renal transplantation; secondary hyperparathyroidism

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian.

Hyperphosphatemia in dialysis: which binder?

Abstract

Several studies have evidenced the association between high serum phosphorus concentrations and adverse events especially in patients on dialysis.

Recent K-DIGO guidelines suggest lowering elevated phosphate levels toward the normal range. This goal should be achieved by combining dietary counseling, optimizing dialysis procedures and prescribing phosphate binders.

Despite the availability of several binders, the “ideal” phosphate binder that combines high efficacy, low pills burden, minimal side effects and low cost is still not available.
In clinical practice it is crucial to reach a high patient’s compliance to therapy. The pill burden is the most relevant factor contributing to low compliance. This is the case of phosphate binder therapy that represents almost 50% of total pills prescribed to patients on dialysis.
It has been evidenced an association between pills of phosphate binder and poor control of phosphorus and PTH.
In recent years sucroferric oxyhydroxide is available as a new phosphate binder. Its
peculiarity is an high phosphate binding capability that requires prescription of low number of pills per day. This characteristic has been confirmed by several randomized controlled trials. These trials have also evidenced that sucroferric oxyhydroxide may cause some gastrointestinal side effects. There is an ongoing study to confirm in “the real world” the incidence of side effects reported by controlled trials.

Key words: Phosphate; Binder; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian.

New scenarios in secondary hyperparathyroidism: etelcalcetide. Position paper of Nephrologists form Lombardy

Abstract

Bone mineral abnormalities (defined as Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral Bone Disorder; CKD-MBD) are prevalent and associated with a substantial risk burden and poor prognosis in CKD population. Several lines of evidence support the notion that a large proportion of patients receiving maintenance dialysis experience a suboptimal biochemical control of CKD-MBD. Although no study has ever demonstrated conclusively that CKD-MBD control is associated with improved survival, an expanding therapeutic armamentarium is available to correct bone mineral abnormalities. In this position paper of Lombardy Nephrologists, a summary of the state of art of CKD-MBD as well as a summary of the unmet clinical needs will be provided. Furthermore, this position paper will focus on the potential and drawbacks of a new injectable calcimimetic, etelcalcetide, a drug available in Italy since few months ago.

 

Keywords: secondary hyperparathyroidism, etelcalcetide, cinacalcet, CKD-MBD, PTH

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian.

Update 2017 of the KDIGO guidelines on Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD). What are the real changes?

Abstract

Guidelines for the assessment, diagnosis and therapy of the alterations that characterize the CKD-MBD are an important support in the clinical practice of the nephrologist. Compared to the KDIGO guidelines published in 2009, the 2017 update made changes on some topics on which there was previously no strong evidence both in terms of diagnosis and therapy. The recommendations include the diagnosis of bone anomalies in CKD-MBD and the treatment of mineral metabolism abnormalities with particular regard to hyperphosphataemia, calcium levels, secondary hyperparathyroidism and anti-resorptive therapies. The Italian Study Group on Mineral Metabolism, in reviewing the 2017 recommendations, aimed to assess the weight of the evidence that led to this update. In fact, on some topics there has not been a substantial difference on the degree of evidence compared to the previous guidelines. The Italian Study Group emphasizes the points that may still reserve critical issues, including interpretation, and invites an evaluation that is articulated and personalized for each patient.

 

Key words: CKD-MBD, BMD, Bone Biopsy, Calcemia, Phosphorus, Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian.