Which is the role of the oral iron therapies for iron deficiency anemia in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease patients? Results from clinical experience

Abstract

Iron deficiency afflicts about 60% of dialysis patients and about 30% of non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients (ND-CKD). The role of iron deficiency in determining anemia in CKD patients is so relevant that guidelines from the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) initiative recommend treating it before starting with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. KDIGO guidelines suggest oral iron therapy because it is commonly available and inexpensive, although it is often characterized by low bioavailability and low compliance due to adverse effects.

A new-generation oral iron therapy is now available and seems to be promising. We therefore conducted a study to determine whether an association of iron sucrose, folic acid and vitamins C, B6, B12, can improve anemia in ND-CKD patients, stage 3-5. Our study shows that iron sucrose is a safe and effective oral iron therapy and that it is capable of correcting anemia in ND-CKD patients, although it does not seem to replete low iron stores.

Keywords: iron deficiency, chronic kidney disease, CKD, anemia, oral iron

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

La carenza marziale, associata o meno all’anemia, rappresenta una delle condizioni più frequenti dei pazienti affetti da malattia renale cronica (MRC), siano essi in terapia conservativa o in terapia dialitica sostitutiva [1,2].

La carenza marziale è definita dalla Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità come una condizione caratterizzata da una quantità di ferro insufficiente a mantenere la fisiologica funzione di sangue, cervello e muscoli. Essa non sempre si associa ad anemia, soprattutto se il deficit non è sufficientemente severo o è di recente insorgenza [3].

 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Covid-19 vaccination and renal patients: overcoming unwarranted fears and re-establishing priorities

Abstract

The SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) has infected about 124 million people worldwide and the total amount of casualties now sits at a staggering 2.7 million. One enigmatic aspect of this disease is the protean nature of the clinical manifestations, ranging from total absence of symptoms to extremely severe cases with multiorgan failure and death.

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) has emerged as the primary risk factor in the most severe patients, apart from age. Kidney disease and acute kidney injury have been correlated with a higher risk of death. Notably the Italian Society of Nephrology have reported a 10-fold increase in mortality in patients undergoing dialysis compared to the rest of the population, especially during the second phase of the pandemic (26% vs 2.4). These dramatic numbers require an immediate response.

At the moment of writing, three Covid-19 vaccines are being administered already , two of which, Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna,  share the same mrna mechanism and Vaxzevria (AstraZeneca) based on a more traditional approach.  All of them are completely safe and reliable. The AIFA scientific commission has suggested that the mRNA vaccines should be administered to older and more fragile patients, while the Vaxzevria (AstraZeneca) vaccine should be reserved for younger subjects above the age of 18. The near future looks bright: there are tens of other vaccines undergoing clinical and preclinical validation, whose preliminary results look promising.

The high mortality of CKD and dialysis patients contracting Covid-19 should mandate top priority for their vaccination.

 

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19), chronic kidney disease, vaccine

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

L’infezione da SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) ha colpito circa 124 milioni di persone nel mondo e si contano a tutt’oggi circa 2.7 milioni di decessi. Una caratteristica ancora enigmatica di tale infezione è l’ampia gamma di manifestazioni cliniche che variano dalla pressoché totale assenza di sintomi a forme estremamente gravi con compromissione multiorgano dall’esito inesorabilmente fatale [1]. L’elevata frequenza di infezioni asintomatiche inoltre ha indubbiamente contribuito alla rapida diffusione mondiale di SARS-CoV-2. Il principale quesito clinico a cui dare una risposta resta quindi ancora strettamente legato alla individuazione precoce dei soggetti ad alto rischio di sviluppare malattia grave. Questi individui possono trarre particolare vantaggio dall’isolamento precauzionale e soprattutto essere un gruppo prioritario per la vaccinazione [1].

 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Phosphorus binders: trigger for intestinal diverticula formation in an ADPKD patient

Abstract

Hyperphosphoremia is common in patients with chronic kidney disease and is an important risk factor in this patient population. Phosphate binding drugs are a key therapeutic strategy to reduce phosphoremia levels, although they have significant side effects especially in the gastrointestinal tract, such as gastritis, diarrhoea and constipation. We report the case of a haemodialysis-dependent patient suffering from chronic kidney disease stage V KDIGO secondary to polycystic autosomal dominant disease; treated with phosphate binders, the case was complicated by the appearance of diverticulosis, evolved into acute diverticulitis.

 

Keywords: hyperphosphoremia, phosphate binding drugs, chronic kidney disease, polycystic autosomal dominant disease, diverticulosis, acute diverticulitis

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Spett.le Editore,

Un recente evento avverso nella gestione di un paziente emodializzato presso la nostra U.O.C. di Nefrologia e Dialisi ci ha impegnati particolarmente e ci ha indotto a pubblicare questa comunicazione, per stimolare la discussione sull’uso dei chelanti del fosforo nei pazienti con insufficienza renale cronica secondaria a Rene Policistico dell’Adulto (ADPKD).

L’iperfosforemia nei pazienti con malattia renale cronica è un accertato fattore di rischio cardiovascolare [13]. La dieta ipofosforica e gli agenti chelanti del fosforo sono, infatti, prescritti nei pazienti con insufficienza renale cronica in fase conservativa ed evoluta in uremia al fine di ridurre i livelli di fosforemia, di migliorare l’iperparatiroidismo secondario ed attenuare la progressione delle calcificazioni vascolari [37]. Inoltre, gli effetti benefici dei chelanti del fosforo sono correlati ad una aumentata sopravvivenza dei pazienti in trattamento emodialitico, in maniera indipendente da altri fattori [8].

 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Renal function performance in CKD stage 5: a sealed fate?

Abstract

Introduction and aims: Stages 4 and 5 of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have always been considered hard to modify in their speed and evolution. We retrospectively evaluated our CKD stage 5 patients (from 01/1/2016 to 12/31/2018), with a view to analyzing their kidney function evolution.

Material and Methods: We included only patients with longer than 6 months follow-up and at least 4 clinical-laboratory controls that included measured Creatinine Clearance (ClCr) and estimated GFR with CKD-EPI (eGFR). We evaluated: the agreement between ClCr and eGFR through Bland-Altman analysis; progression rate, classified as fast (eGFR loss >5ml/min/year), slow (eGFR loss 1-5 ml/min/year) and non-progressive (eGFR loss <1 ml/min/year or eGFR increase). We also evaluated which clinical-laboratory parameters (diabetes, blood pressure control, use of ACEi/ARBs, ischemic myocardiopathy, peripheral obliterant arteriopathy (POA), proteinuria, hemoglobin, uric acid, PTH, phosphorus) were associated to the different eGFR progression classes by means of bivariate regression and multinomial multiple regression model. Results: Measured CrCl and eGFR where often in agreement, especially for GFR values <12ml/min. The average slope of eGFR was -3.05 ±3.68 ml/min/1.73 m2/year. The progression of kidney function was fast in 17% of the patients, slow in 57.6%, non-progressive in 25.4%. At the bivariate analysis, a fast progression was associated with poor blood pressure control (p=0.038) and ACEi/ARBs use (p=0.043). In the multivariable model, only peripheral obliterative arteriopathy proved associated to an increased risk of fast progression of eGFR (relative risk ratio=5.97).

Discussion: Less than one fifth of our patients presented a fast GFR loss (>5 ml/min/year). The vast majority showed a slow progression, stabilisation or even an improvement. Despite the limits due to the small sample size, the data has encouraged us not to consider CKD stage 5 as an inexorable and short journey towards artificial replacement therapy.

 

Keywords: chronic kidney disease, CKD, disease progression, glomerular filtrate, chronic renal failure

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

La malattia renale cronica (Chronic Kidney Disease, CKD) colpisce oltre 850 milioni di persone nel mondo (11% circa della popolazione mondiale) [1]; di questi, 37 milioni sono negli Stati Uniti (pari al 15% della popolazione) [2], 38 milioni in Europa (il 10% della popolazione) [3] e circa 4 milioni in Italia, pari a circa il 7% della popolazione [4]. Numerosi studi hanno approfondito i fattori di rischio e progressione del danno renale cronico, spesso includendo nel campione fasi di CKD estremamente polimorfe come fenotipo clinico, rischio cardiovascolare e complicanze in corso di malattia [58].

Agli inizi degli anni ’90, Maschio [10] considerava un valore di creatininemia di circa 2 mg/dl come un “punto di non-ritorno” della storia naturale della CKD,  al di là del quale si prevedeva un inevitabile e progressivo peggioramento della funzione renale, nonostante gli interventi di tipo dietetico e terapeutico messi in atto. Tutt’oggi si ritiene che la malattia renale cronica abbia un andamento prevalentemente lineare con una progressione più rapida nelle fasi più avanzate. Recenti studi osservazionali [11, 12] hanno evidenziato invece come nelle fasi avanzate della CKD la modalità di progressione possa essere variabile, mostrando spesso un andamento non lineare e fortemente eterogeneo.

 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Treating anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: what evidence for using ESAs, after a 30-year journey?

Abstract

Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESAs) are well-tolerated and effective drugs for the treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

In the past, scientific research and clinical practice around ESAs have mainly focused on the haemoglobin target to reach, and to moving towards the normality range; more cautious approach has been taken more recently. However, little attention has been paid to possible differences among ESA molecules. Although they present a common mechanism of action on the erythropoietin receptor, their peculiar pharmacodynamic characteristics could give different signals of activation of the receptor, with possible clinical differences.

Some studies and metanalyses did not show significant differences among ESAs. More recently, an observational study of the Japanese Registry of dialysis showed a 20% higher risk of mortality from any cause in the patients treated with long-acting ESAs in comparison to those treated with short-acting ESAs; the difference increased in those treated with higher doses. These results were not confirmed by a recent, post-registration, randomised, clinical trial, which did not show any significant difference in the risk of death from any cause or cardiovascular events between short-acting ESAs and darbepoetin alfa or methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta. Finally, data from an Italian observational study, which was carried out in non-dialysis CKD patients, showed an association between the use of high doses of ESA and an increased risk of terminal CKD, limited only to the use of short-acting ESAs.

In conclusion, one randomised clinical trial supports a similar safety profile for long- versus short-acting ESAs. Observational studies should always be considered with some caution: they are hypothesis generating, but they may suffer from bias by indication.

Keywords: anaemia, erythropoiesis stimulating agents, ESAs, mortality, chronic kidney disease, long acting, short acting

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

Dalla pubblicazione dello storico lavoro di Eschbach più di 30 anni fa [1], il trattamento dell’anemia con i farmaci stimolanti l’eritropoiesi (Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents, ESAs) ha rivoluzionato la qualità della vita dei pazienti con malattia renale cronica (Chronic Kidney Disease, CKD). In quegli anni i pazienti erano gravemente anemici e spesso sopravvivevano con livelli di emoglobina anche inferiori a 5 g/dL, ricorrendo a periodiche trasfusioni, con alto rischio di trasmissione di un’epatite allora sconosciuta, definita “non A-non B” (oggi chiamata C) e con conseguente accumulo di grandi quantità di ferro. Nei casi più gravi i nefrologi erano costretti ad intervenire con un trattamento chelante a base di desferriossamina, a sua volta gravato da serie complicanze come la mucoviscidosi. Improvvisamente, grazie all’utilizzo dell’eritropoietina, i pazienti ricominciarono a vivere. Tale era l’entusiasmo dei nefrologi nel poter finalmente correggere efficacemente la grave anemia dei loro pazienti cronici, che si fecero trascinare fino a una correzione troppo rapida dei valori di emoglobina, portando a complicanze come un aumento dei valori pressori sino a severe crisi ipertensive e, a volte, convulsioni. 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

SGLT2 inhibitors, beyond glucose-lowering effect: impact on nephrology clinical practice

Abstract

Epidemiological data show an increasing diffusion of diabetes mellitus worldwide. In the diabetic subject, the risk of onset of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its progression to the terminal stage remain high, despite current prevention and treatment measures. Although SGLT2 inhibitors have been approved as blood glucose lowering drugs, they have shown unexpected and surprising cardioprotective and nephroprotective efficacy. The multiple underlying mechanisms of action are independent and go beyond glycemic lowering. Hence, it has been speculated to extend the use of these drugs also to subjects with advanced stages of CKD, who were initially excluded because of the expected limited glucose-lowering effect. Non-diabetic patients could also benefit from the favorable effects of SGLT2 inhibitors: subjects with renal diseases with different etiologies, heart failure, high risk or full-blown cardiovascular disease. In addition, these drugs have a good safety profile, but several post-marketing adverse event have been reported. The ongoing clinical trials will provide clearer information on efficacy, strength and safety of these molecules. The purpose of this review is to analyze the available evidence and future prospects of SGLT2 inhibitors, which could be widely used in nephrology clinical practice.

Keywords: diabetes, oral hypoglycemic agents, SGLT2 inhibitors, chronic kidney disease

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

Il diabete mellito (DM) è una delle patologie più diffuse nel mondo: ne soffre circa l’8,5% della popolazione adulta ed il trend nelle ultime decadi mostra un progressivo aumento dell’incidenza e della prevalenza [1].

La malattia renale cronica (MRC) è frequente complicanza del DM, sia di tipo 1 (DM1) che di tipo 2 (DM2). Si calcola che tra il 40 e il 50% dei soggetti affetti da DM2 sviluppa MRC nell’arco della vita e la sua presenza e severità influenzano significativamente la prognosi [2, 3, 4]. Pochi e dibattuti sono i dati relativi alla progressione del danno renale nel diabetico fino alla malattia renale cronica terminale (ESRD). Le cifre sono sottostimate e inficiate dall’elevata mortalità di questi soggetti, molti dei quali muoiono prima di giungere alla necessità di terapia sostitutiva della funzione renale, soprattutto per patologie cardiovascolari (CV) [5, 6, 7]. Negli Stati Uniti nel 2010 la prevalenza di ESRD tra i diabetici adulti è stata di 20/10.000 [8]. Guardando all’eziopatogenesi, il DM è ormai stabilmente la causa principale dell’ESRD. È da ascrivere al DM il 23% e il 16% dei casi incidenti e prevalenti di ESRD, rispettivamente, secondo il più recente report ERA-EDTA (European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association) [9]. 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Economic impact of ferric carboxymaltose in haemodialysis patients

Abstract

Intravenous iron supplementation is essential in hemodialysis (HD) patients to recover blood loss and to meet the requirements for erythropoiesis and, in patients receiving erythropoietin, to avert the development of iron deficiency. In a recent real-world study, Hofman et al. showed that a therapeutic shift from iron sucrose (IS) to ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in HD patients improves iron parameters while reducing use of iron and erythropoietin. The objective of this economic analysis is to compare the weekly cost of treatment of FCM vs IS in hemodialysis patients in Italy. The consumption of drugs (iron and erythropoietin) was derived from Hofman’s data, while the value was calculated at Italian ex-factory prices. The analysis was carried on the total patient sample and in two subgroups: patients with iron deficiency and patients anemic at baseline. In addition, specific sensitivity analyses considered prices currently applied at the regional level, simulating the use of IS vs iron gluconate (FG) and epoetin beta vs epoetin alfa. In the base-case analysis, the switch to FCM generates savings of -€12.47 per patient/week (-21%) in all patients, and even greater savings in the subgroups with iron deficiency -€17.28 (-27%) and in anemic patients -€23.08 (-32%). Sensitivity analyses were always favorable to FCM and confirmed the robustness of the analysis. FCM may represent a cost-saving option for the NHS, and Italian real-world studies are needed to quantify the real consumption of resources in dialysis patients.

 

Keywords: ferric carboxymaltose, intravenous iron supplementation, chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis, drugs consumption, economic impact

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

La prevalenza dei pazienti con malattia renale cronica (MRC) è pari al 10-16% della popolazione adulta mondiale [1] con tassi di incidenza in aumento nel corso degli anni [1,2]. Questo trend rappresenta una sfida per i diversi Sistemi Sanitari e i pagatori in generale, particolarmente quando si consideri il più elevato consumo di risorse nei pazienti più anziani [3,4]. Soprattutto, va evidenziato che la mortalità legata alla MRC è quasi duplicata, tra il 1990 e il 2010, con un aumento, in termini di anni persi per morte prematura, inferiore solo a HIV-AIDS e diabete mellito [5].
 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Management of hemodialysis patient subject to medical-nuclear investigation

Abstract

In recent years imaging techniques that use radionuclides have become more and more clinically relevant as they can provide functional information for specific anatomical districts. This has also involved nephrology, where radionuclides are used to study patients with different degrees of renal function failure up to terminal uremia. Although chronic kidney disease, and dialysis in particular, may affect the distribution and the elimination of radiopharmaceuticals, to date there are no consistent data on the risks associated with their use in this clinical context. In addition to the lack of data on the safety of radio-exposure in dialysis patients, there is also a shortage of information concerning the risk for healthcare staff involved in conducting the dialysis sessions performed after a nuclear test.

This study, performed on 29 uremic patients who underwent hemodialysis immediately after a scintigraphic examination, assessed the extent of radio-contamination of the staff and of hemodialysis devices such as monitor, kits and dialysate. The data collected has been used to quantify the radiological risk in dialysis after the exposure to the most common radionuclides.

 

Keywords: chronic kidney disease, imaging, radionuclides, hemodialysis, scintigraphy, radiological risk

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

Negli ultimi decenni l’evoluzione delle metodiche di imaging ha contribuito significativamente al miglioramento dell’accuratezza diagnostica in medicina. Tra le varie metodiche, quelle utilizzanti radionuclidi, per le caratteristiche in esse presenti, hanno permesso di studiare aspetti particolari della patologia umana. La medicina nucleare usa il principio del tracciante. Le radiazioni, principalmente fotoni gamma, emesse dal radionuclide vengono convertite in immagini planari o tomografiche attraverso la Gamma Camera. Grazie alla versatilità dei radionuclidi, la medicina nucleare trova applicazione in diversi ambiti della clinica [1].

Secondo i dati UNSCEAR 2000 ogni anno vengono effettuati nel mondo circa 32 milioni di esami di medicina nucleare [2]. La crescente diffusione dell’esame scintigrafico e della Tomografia ad Emissione di Positroni (PET), nel corso dell’ultimo decennio, deriva principalmente dalla loro notevole capacità di integrazione e/o sostituzione delle classiche metodiche di imaging pesante (TC, RM, etc.). La scintigrafia è una tecnica di diagnostica funzionale che, previa somministrazione di un tracciante radioattivo (che si distribuisce nel corpo in base alle sue proprietà chimiche e biologiche), ne valuta e/o quantifica la distribuzione negli organi e nei tessuti che si vogliono studiare. La PET è un esame diagnostico che prevede l’acquisizione di immagini fisiologiche basate sul rilevamento di due fotoni gamma che viaggiano in direzioni opposte. Questi fotoni sono generati dall’annientamento di un positrone con un elettrone nativo. La scansione PET, eseguita con fluorodesossiglucosio (FDG), fornisce informazioni metaboliche qualitative e quantitative. L’FDG è un analogo radiomarcato del glucosio che viene assorbito dalle cellule metabolicamente attive come le cellule tumorali. Le scansioni PET sono in grado di dimostrare un’attività metabolica anormale prima che si siano verificati cambiamenti morfologici. L’attività metabolica dell’area di interesse viene valutata sia mediante ispezione visiva delle immagini sia misurando un valore semi-quantitativo dell’assorbimento di FDG chiamato valore di assorbimento standardizzato (SUV). L’applicazione clinica più comune della PET è in oncologia, dove viene impiegata per differenziare le lesioni benigne dalle lesioni maligne, monitorare l’effetto della terapia su neoplasie conosciute, riposizionare e rilevare la recidiva del tumore; viene anche utilizzata in cardiologia, per la valutazione di aree di ischemia, e in neurologia, nella diagnosi differenziale di demenza e sindrome di Parkinson [3,4].

 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Temporal variation of Chronic Kidney Disease’s epidemiology

Abstract

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for mortality and morbidity, as well as a growing public health problem. Several studies describe the epidemiology of CKD (i.e. prevalence, incidence) by examining short time intervals. Conversely, the trend of epidemiology over time has not been well investigated, although it may provide useful information on how to improve prevention measures and the allocation of economic resources. Our aim here is to describe the main aspects of the epidemiology of CKD by focusing on its temporal variation. The global incidence of CKD has increased by 89% in the last 27 years, primarily due to the improved socio-demographic index and life-expectancy. Prevalence has similarly increased by 87% over the same period. Mortality rate has however decreased over the last decades, both in the general and CKD populations, due to a reduction in cardiovascular and infectious disease mortality. It is important to emphasize that the upward trend of incidence and prevalence of CKD can be explained by the ageing of the population, as well as by the increase in the prevalence of comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity. It seems hard to compare trends between Italy and other countries because of the different methods used to assess epidemiologic measures. The creation of specific CKD Registries in Italy appears therefore necessary to monitor the trend of CKD and its comorbidities over time.

Keywords: chronic kidney disease, CKD, epidemiology, registers, socio-demographic index

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Introduzione

La malattia renale cronica (CKD) è una condizione patologica associata ad un alto rischio di mortalità e di morbidità. È stato infatti dimostrato, in studi di popolazione generale e di pazienti seguiti dalle unità nefrologiche, che la presenza di un valore di filtrato glomerulare stimato (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1,73m2 o di proteinuria si associa ad un alto rischio di sviluppare, nel tempo, eventi cardiovascolari (CV) maggiori (malattia coronarica, scompenso cardiaco, vasculopatia periferica), progressione del danno renale (riduzione del eGFR ed ingresso in dialisi) e mortalità da tutte le cause [15].  

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.

Protein carbamylation: what it is and why it concerns nephrologists

Abstract

Abstract: Spontaneous urea dissociation in water solution is a prominent source of protein carbamylation in our body. Protein carbamylation is a well-known phenomenon since early seventies. Some years ago, much interest in the diagnostic power of carbamylated protein arouse. Recently the target of the researches focused on its potential cardiovascular pathogenicity. Some authors claimed that this could be a reason for higher cardiovascular mortality in uremic patients. Nutritional therapy, amino acids supplementation and intensive dialysis regimen are some of the therapeutic tools tested to lower the carbamylation burst in this population.

 

Keywords: protein carbamylation, urea, chronic kidney disease

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Biochimica del cianato e della carbamilazione

Il cianato (acido cianico) è una molecola che deriva dalla dissociazione spontanea in soluzione acquosa dell’urea; la reazione completa porta alla produzione di cianato e ammoniaca e in vitro tale reazione è spostata dalla parte della formazione dell’urea per oltre il 99% (1). Il cianato, dunque, è un composto azotato che si produce fisiologicamente nel nostro organismo, ma solo in piccole quantità e si pone spontaneamente in equilibrio col suo isomero più reattivo isocianato.

La concentrazione plasmatica in individui sani di isocianato è di circa 50 nmol/L (1), un valore che, tuttavia, è circa mille volte inferiore rispetto a quanto previsto dai parametri cinetici di decomposizione dell’urea. La stessa osservazione è stata fatta nei pazienti uremici, dove la concentrazione di isocianato rilevata era sì aumentata (140 nmol/l), ma comunque di gran lunga inferiore a quanto atteso (2). La spiegazione di questo fenomeno è che, poiché come detto l’acido isocianico è molto reattivo, parte di questo composto viene consumato come substrato di altre reazioni chimiche. In particolare il cianato è in grado di cedere il gruppo “carbamoile” (-CONH2) ad una molecola organica e questa reazione è generalmente indicata con il nome di carbamilazione. In realtà il termine chimico più appropriato, e raccomandato dalla “International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry”, sarebbe carbamoilazione (3), ma nella gran parte della letteratura scientifica è utilizzato il primo termine. 

La visualizzazione dell’intero documento è riservata a Soci attivi, devi essere registrato e aver eseguito la Login con utente e password.